6 maneras de mejorar el cuarto de espera

Six Ways To Improve Doctors’ Waiting Rooms

Spanish design consultancy Fuelfor shows how better design can reduce patients’ anxiety while they wait (and wait and wait) at the doctor’s office.

Waiting endlessly in a doctor’s office ranks up there as one of life’s premier annoyances, right alongside queuing up at the DMV and getting manhandled at airport security. Short of overhauling our overstretched health care system, though, the problem isn’t going away anytime soon. Luckily, design can make it a hell of a lot more tolerable.

So suggests Fuelfor, a Spanish design consultancy, which compiled a case study on “Rethinking the waiting room.” Research has shown that a well-designed waiting room — one that includes everything from comfortable chairs to clear signage to easy-to-use patient response forms — can bolster how patients feel about the care they receive and even streamline the care process itself. Fuelfor has identified six ways of dramatically improving waiting rooms. We’ve summarized them below:

Comfortable seating
Waiting when you’re sick is bad enough. Waiting in a crappy chair when you’re sick is downright galling. What’s more, what’s comfortable for one patient might be deeply uncomfortable, or even painful, for another. Fuelfor proposes a modular seating system, called MODU, that can be adapted to different offices and individuals. Movable armrests and seating pads with various amounts of cushion let people create their own little comfort zone. Planters keep the air feeling fresh and displays at the end of each bench apprise patients of their wait time. Acoustic separators eke out space for private phone calls.

Manageable queues
“Queue management displays in waiting rooms make people feel physically tied to one spot,” Fuelfor writes. Taking a number isn’t much better — it’s impersonal and disposable (not unlike your average doctor’s appointment). Fuelfor’s solution: feature wait-time displays prominently in multiple places, not just over the central counter. People who don’t want to hang around the waiting room can download Inline, a conceptual iPhone app that reveals their number in the queue with a clear, simple interface. It also lets patients book appointments, locate the room of their appointment, and track medications, among other health-management features.

Clear medical records
More and more, medical records are going digital, but Fuelfor suggests a low-tech alternative to ensure that people can simply and viscerally manage their own health. With FOLIO, patients store their medications and appointment dates in paper wallets that be thrown in a purse or back pocket and carted easily to the doctor’s office. At the office, they use the FOLIO info to fill out “Prepare,” a patient-response form that asks simple questions in a clear format designed to prevent mistakes. After the appointment, doctors fill out a separate “Remember” form that includes prescriptions and other health advice. It might sound like a lot of paperwork, but with good graphic design, it can actually feel pretty simple.

Healthy food
It’s always hilarious (in a depressing way) to see vending machines full of chips, candy, and soda at medical clinics that are supposed to be billboards for healthy living. Fuelfor conceived of a vending machine that dispenses water, apples, and other nutritious snacks while you wait. It’s even designed like a kitchen counter to emphasize the idea that smart eating starts at home.

Welcoming signage
Doctors’ waiting rooms can feel terribly impersonal and bureaucratic. To inject a modicum of humanity, Fuelfor recommends throwing up welcome boards that introduce the doctors on duty (complete with portraits, so they aren’t just faceless names) and post information about healthy activities and classes, like yoga for seniors and cooking lessons.

Communal space
Fuelfor says that communal tables can help reduce patients’ anxiety in a waiting room. We’re not totally sold on this one. People like privacy. Especially sick people. Then again, if you’re at the doctor’s office with your family, a large table where you can gather and discuss sensitive medical problems makes a lot of sense. It could also figure prominently during medical consultations (just as long as it isn’t, you know, too communal). Think about it: Instead of parking it on an examination table while your doctor dispenses advice that you can’t even pay attention to because you feel so awkward in your ridiculous little gown, you could meet at a big, roomy table — clothes on, dignity intact.

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Introvertidos o extrovertidos

Ultimamente ha habido gran polémica respecto a la veracidad de ciertas técnicas como el brainstorming y el trabajo en ambientes de trabajo, de hecho un artículo muy bueno al respecto es el de “Power of Shyness” de la revista Time  nos destaca el valor de los introvertidos al ser en muchas ocasiones mas reflexivos y concentrados que sus contrapartes, los extrovertidos. Sobre todo en un contexto como el norteamericano donde los aplausos ya por muchas décadas se los llevan personas que tienden a ser extrovertidas

Les comparto el siguiente video TED de Susan Cain la autora del libro Quiet, “The power of introverts”. veanlo y me diran su punto de vista.

 

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http://www.ted.com/talks/susan_cain_the_power_of_introverts.html

 

En cuanto a nuestra disciplina, que gran parte busca adaptarse al modelo norteamericano, sobretodo en cuanto a negocios e innovación, sería bueno reflexionar respecto a lograr ya sea en nuestra empresa o con nuestros alumos a un equilibrio entre ambos puntos del espectro y propiciar espacios donde podamos trabajar en grupo y la mismo tiempo tengamos tambien momentos de soledad y privacidad. Como siempre la búsqueda de este equilibrio es lo que mas nos beneficiaría.

Finalmente lo que me lleva a comunicarles todo esto es que yo me considero mas dentro del espectro de los extrovertidos, pero he convivido gran parte de mi vida con mi papá y mi esposo que son definitivamente de parte de los introvertidos y a partir de este artículo creo que los entiendo mejor.

 

Porque hay que apareciar las expectativas en una experiencia

How Expectations Can Turn Anything From Worthless To Priceless

Whether its wine or music, the pleasure we take from an experience has everything to do with expectations, writes psychologist Paul Bloom.

[This post originally appeared in the current issue of designmind, a business, technology and design magazine published by frog.]

Why are we so concerned with the origins of objects? Why do we respond so much to our knowledge of where something comes from, whether it’s a forgery, whether it belonged to a celebrity, or whether we are related to someone or not?

 

Wanna get kids to like carrots? Tell them they’re from McDonald’s.

Well, many sociologists like Thorstein Veblen and Alan Wolfe would argue that the reason why we take origins so seriously is because we’re snobs; because we’re focused on status. Among other things, if you want to show off how rich or how powerful you are, it’s always better to own an original than a forgery because there will always be fewer originals than forgeries. But there’s something else going on. Humans are, to some extent, natural-born essentialists.

 

[How much is this painting by Vermeer worth? $10 million? Reconsider: How much is this forgery of Vermeer worth?. Consider the picture up top: Do you find the young woman attractive? Yes? Reconsider: Do you find the picture of your mother as a young woman attractive?]

What I mean by this is that we don’t just respond to things as we see, feel, or hear them. Rather, our response is conditioned by our beliefs of where things come from, what they’re made of, or what their hidden nature is. I believe that this is true, not just for how we think about things, but how we react to things.

This phenomenon suggests that pleasure is deep—and that this isn’t true just for higher-level pleasures like art. Even our most seemingly simple pleasures are affected by our beliefs about hidden essences.

Take food. Here’s a pop quiz. Would you eat some unknown pieces of what looks like meat?

Well, a good answer is, “It depends. What is it?” Some of you would eat it if it were pork, but not beef. Some of you would eat it if it were beef, but not pork. Few of you would eat it if it were a rat or a human. Some of you would eat this only if these were strangely colored pieces of tofu. That’s not so surprising.

What’s more interesting is that how it tastes to you will depend critically on what you think you’re eating. One demonstration of this was done with young children. How do you make children eat more carrots and drink milk—and not just eat more, but get more pleasure from eating carrots and drinking milk, to actually get them to think they taste better? It’s simple: You tell them the carrots and milk are from McDonald’s. They believe McDonald’s food is tastier, and it leads them to experience it as tastier.

You can use the same strategy to get adults to enjoy any type of wine. It’s very simple: pour the wine from an expensive bottle. There are now dozens, perhaps hundreds, of studies showing that if you believe you’re drinking the expensive stuff, it tastes better to you. This was recently tested with a neuroscientific twist. Researchers placed participants into a dMRI scanner and had them sip wine through a tube while they lay there. On a screen in front of each subject was information about the wine. Everybody, of course, was drinking exactly the same wine. But among those who believed they were drinking the expensive stuff, parts of the brain associated with pleasure and reward lit up like a Christmas tree. It’s not just that they said it was more pleasurable or they liked it more: They really experienced it in a different way.

Here’s a particularly dramatic example of how pleasure depends on our beliefs, illustrated by a case study of a woman with a neurological disorder known as Capgras syndrome. Capgras is a disorder that causes sufferers to believe a specific delusion—that the people they love most in the world have been replaced by perfect duplicates. Often, the result of Capgras syndrome is tragic. People have murdered those they loved, believing they were murdering an imposter. But there’s at least one case where Capgras syndrome had a happy ending. This was recorded in 1931. Researchers described a woman with Capgras syndrome who complained about “her poorly endowed and sexually inadequate lover.” But that was before she got Capgras syndrome. After she got it, she was happy to report that she had “discovered that he possessed a double who was rich, virile, handsome, and aristocratic.” Of course, it was the same man, but she was seeing him in different ways.

[How much are these old gold clubs worth? $750? Reconsider: How much are Jack Kennedy’s golf clubs worth?]

A more recent illustration of essentialism has to do with the pleasure of listening to music. You may have heard of Joshua Bell, the famous violinist. A Washington Post reporter, Gene Weingarten, decided to enlist him for an audacious experiment. Weingarten wanted to find out how much people would like the music of Joshua Bell if they didn’t know they were listening to Joshua Bell.

 

It’s not just imaginary: They experienced it in a different way.

So Weingarten got Bell to take his million-dollar violin down to a Washington, D.C., subway station, stand in the corner, and see how much money he would make as a street musician. After being there for 45 minutes, he made $32. Not bad for an everyday busker. But for a professional classical musician who regularly sells out concert venues? Not good. Apparently, to really enjoy the music of Joshua Bell, you have to know you’re listening to Joshua Bell.

 

All of the examples I’ve shared are about pleasure, but essentialism—how you think about what you’re experiencing and your beliefs about the essence of it—also affects how we experience pain.

Harvard’s Kurt Gray and Daniel M. Wegner hooked up undergraduates to an electric shock machine, and then gave them a series of five painful electric shocks. Half of the students were told that they were being given the shocks by a person in another room. They were also told that the person in the other room didn’t know they were giving the shocks. In other words, there was no malevolence. They were just pressing a button. The first shock was recorded as very painful. The second shock felt less painful because the students got a bit used to it. The third shock dropped again, as did the fourth and the fifth. The pain had a lesser and lesser effect.

In the other group, students were told that the person in the next room was shocking them on purpose. The first shock hurt like hell. The second shock hurt just as much, as did the third, fourth, and fifth shocks. Conclusion: It hurts more if you believe somebody is doing something to you on purpose.

Of course, in some cases, pain under the right circumstances can transform into pleasure. Humans have an extraordinarily interesting tendency to seek out low-level doses of pain in controlled circumstances and take pleasure from it. Eating hot chili peppers and going on roller coaster rides are two examples.

While pain for pleasure is the most extreme example of an essentialist experience, it underscores in how many areas of life we seek out essential pleasures. The poet John Milton has one of the best descriptions of how essentialism influences our everyday pleasures—and pains—while still being as relevant today as it was when Milton was writing in the 17th. “The mind is its own place,” he observed. “And in itself can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven.”

To read more articles from designmind, click here.

Paul Bloom

PAUL BLOOM

Paul Bloom is a psychologist and author of How Pleasure Works. Read more

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6 maneras de mejorar la sala de espera del doctor

La compañía Fuelfor de Barcelona, hizo este ejercicio muy interesate para reducir la ansiedad en pacientes, por lo menos en la sala de espera el doctor.  vía Co.Design Daily / fast company 

Waiting endlessly in a doctor’s office ranks up there as one of life’s premier annoyances, right alongside queuing up at the DMV and getting manhandled at airport security. Short of overhauling our overstretched health care system, though, the problem isn’t going away anytime soon. Luckily, design can make it a hell of a lot more tolerable.

So suggests Fuelfor, a Spanish design consultancy, which compiled a case study on “Rethinking the waiting room.” Research has shown that a well-designed waiting room — one that includes everything from comfortable chairs to clear signage to easy-to-use patient response forms — can bolster how patients feel about the care they receive and even streamline the care process itself. Fuelfor has identified six ways of dramatically improving waiting rooms. We’ve summarized them below:

 

 

Comfortable seating
Waiting when you’re sick is bad enough. Waiting in a crappy chair when you’re sick is downright galling. What’s more, what’s comfortable for one patient might be deeply uncomfortable, or even painful, for another. Fuelfor proposes a modular seating system, called MODU, that can be adapted to different offices and individuals. Movable armrests and seating pads with various amounts of cushion let people create their own little comfort zone. Planters keep the air feeling fresh and displays at the end of each bench apprise patients of their wait time. Acoustic separators eke out space for private phone calls.

 

 

Manageable queues
“Queue management displays in waiting rooms make people feel physically tied to one spot,” Fuelfor writes. Taking a number isn’t much better — it’s impersonal and disposable (not unlike your average doctor’s appointment). Fuelfor’s solution: feature wait-time displays prominently in multiple places, not just over the central counter. People who don’t want to hang around the waiting room can download Inline, a conceptual iPhone app that reveals their number in the queue with a clear, simple interface. It also lets patients book appointments, locate the room of their appointment, and track medications, among other health-management features.

 

 

Clear medical records
More and more, medical records are going digital, but Fuelfor suggests a low-tech alternative to ensure that people can simply and viscerally manage their own health. With FOLIO, patients store their medications and appointment dates in paper wallets that be thrown in a purse or back pocket and carted easily to the doctor’s office. At the office, they use the FOLIO info to fill out “Prepare,” a patient-response form that asks simple questions in a clear format designed to prevent mistakes. After the appointment, doctors fill out a separate “Remember” form that includes prescriptions and other health advice. It might sound like a lot of paperwork, but with good graphic design, it can actually feel pretty simple.

 

 

Healthy food
It’s always hilarious (in a depressing way) to see vending machines full of chips, candy, and soda at medical clinics that are supposed to be billboards for healthy living. Fuelfor conceived of a vending machine that dispenses water, apples, and other nutritious snacks while you wait. It’s even designed like a kitchen counter to emphasize the idea that smart eating starts at home.

 

 

Welcoming signage
Doctors’ waiting rooms can feel terribly impersonal and bureaucratic. To inject a modicum of humanity, Fuelfor recommends throwing up welcome boards that introduce the doctors on duty (complete with portraits, so they aren’t just faceless names) and post information about healthy activities and classes, like yoga for seniors and cooking lessons.

Communal space
Fuelfor says that communal tables can help reduce patients’ anxiety in a waiting room. We’re not totally sold on this one. People like privacy. Especially sick people. Then again, if you’re at the doctor’s office with your family, a large table where you can gather and discuss sensitive medical problems makes a lot of sense. It could also figure prominently during medical consultations (just as long as it isn’t, you know, too communal). Think about it: Instead of parking it on an examination table while your doctor dispenses advice that you can’t even pay attention to because you feel so awkward in your ridiculous little gown, you could meet at a big, roomy table — clothes on, dignity intact.

 

SUZANNE LABARRE

 

Suzanne is a senior editor at Co.Design. … Read more